The intersection between migration and health in later life in a cross-border context: a comparative study in Taiwan, England and oceanic countries.

Aging is an issue of globalization. In 2019, the elderly population ratio in the England, New Zealand, Taiwan and Malaysia are 18%, 15%, 14% and 6.7% respectively. All the island countries above are oceanic cultures, there are a lot of Chinese immigrants in these countries. According to the census survey in England, the Chinese immigrants in 2011 have 400,000 population. The New Zealand Statistics showed more than 170,171,411 Chinese ethnic groups in 2013. Furthermore, the Chinese immigrants are the second largest ethnic group in Malaysia, accounting for 43.2% in Malaysian capital in 2010.
The elderly from the Chinese Evergreen Clubs, the Gerontological Societies and the Clan Associations in Taiwan, United Kingdom, New Zealandand and Malaysia are the main research participants as those social groups provide education for or make friendly contacts with senior citizens. This study uses their assembly hours to issue questionnaires and ask them to fill out the questionnaires. Or, this study uses the temples as the center of faith or schools where people of the Chinese origin gather to select the New Old for questionnaire surveys.
The cross-country comparison of the Chinese elderly population in the study of the four Oceanic culture countries is a new topic. Research scholars can expand the field of research and at the same time give the public a new perspective on ageing issues. We will use long-term follow-up data and interviews from four countries in England, New Zealand, Taiwan and Malaysia to explore the attitudes of Chinese elderly in different countries on ageing issues, the impact of senior policies and the social networks behind oceanic culture countries. After 12 months research period, it is expected to understand the characteristics of Chinese elderly, the important issues on aging, the situation of social support, common diseases in elderly and physical indicators (physical function, psychological, cognitive function) in four oceanic cultural countries, which are England, New Zealand, Taiwan and Malaysia.

  • Dr. Arier Lee, The University of Auckland
  • Dr. Janine Paynter, The University of Auckland
  • Prof. David Bunce, University of Leeds 

Public Health (Non-communicable Disease)