Negotiating Transition to a ‘Grown Up World’: the Journey to Sexual and Reproductive Health for Unaccompanied Adolescent Asylum Seekers

We aim to develop a global network focused on generating effective, evidence-based policy and practice guidance that support unaccompanied child and adolescent asylum seekers (UAS) as they negotiate age-related life transitions in relation to their sexual and reproductive health in asylum and settlement countries.

UAS around the world face increased risks in relation to sexual and reproductive health outcomes, yet there is limited empirical research to underpin public health interventions. A specific evidence gap is how UAS behaviours and processes of protection may operate in achieving sexual and reproductive health. To address this gap, new ways of working, which ensure that the voices of UAS join with, and contribute to, initiatives aimed at shaping effective policy and practice interventions are needed.

The network will include: WUN partners, professionals, voluntary organisations and service users focused on achieving the aims and objectives developed in response to the aim of the WUN Public Health Global Challenge of addressing non-communicable diseases within a life-course approach.

Key Objectives and Outputs

Establishment of a global network consisting of academic, professional and lay/service user members, committed to:

  • Undertaking a global systematic mapping of literature, policy and practice linked to: resilience, risk and protective processes for UAS, with specific reference to sexual and reproductive health.
  • Increasing global awareness, prominence and coordination of efforts in achieving a greater insight and understanding of resilience, risk and protective processes for UAS.
  • Generating evidence-based practice/policy publications and resources linked to a robust research agenda supported by further grant development/enterprise and partnerships.
  • Exploration and adoption of creative research methodologies and activities to increase the engagement and participation of UAS with research and dissemination.
  • Dr Jane March-McDonald, University of Southampton
  • Professor Tong Yuying, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Dr Cathy Brennan, University of Leeds
  • Dr Catherine Stones, University of Leeds
  • Dr Amanda Mason-Jones, Univerisity of York
  • Dr Aisha Hutchinson, University of Bedfordshire
  • Dr Emilia Pietka-Nykaza, University of West of Scotland
  • Dr Alison B. Strang, Queen Margaret University
  • Dr Bregje de Kok, Queen Margaret University
  • Dr Carola Eyber, Queen Margaret University

Understanding Cultures

Public Health (Non-communicable Disease)